Levy County School District Voluntary Prekindergarten Education

Parents/Guardians:

The School Board of Levy County is excited to announce that PreK for 4 year olds will be a FREE FULL DAY program. Your  child must be 4 years old on or before September 1, of the current school year. Breakfast, lunch, and transportation will also be free. Applications will open online January 1, for the school year that begins in August.

Before applying you will need:                                                                                                    

Your child must have a VPK certificate.  

Proof of your child’s age:

  • by birth certificate or updated immunization record

Proof of physical address:

  • driver’s license

  • or a utility bill less than 60 days old

  • or a paystub less than 30 days old

  • or a car registration with current information on it

  • or a lease with first page, last page, and signature page

You will have to upload these two items during the application. After you submit the application online you will receive the Child Eligibility Certificate 2 to three business days later.   

  • Local libraries or the Early Learning Coalition have computers you can use. If you have questions please call the Early Learning Coalition 352-490-5855.

  • Print this out and quickly take it to the school nearest you.  Do this quickly so that your child will be put on the list to attend PreK.

Homeless Rights and Information

If, due to a loss of housing, you must live in a shelter, motel, vehicle, or campground, on the street, in abandoned buildings or doubled-up with relatives or friends, then you are eligible to receive services provided under the McKinney-Vento Act.

YOUR CHILDREN HAVE THE RIGHT TO:

  • Go to school, no matter where you live or how long you have lived there

  • Continue in the school they last attended before you became homeless or the school
    they last attended, if that is your choice and it is feasible

  • Receive transportation to the school they last attended before your family became
    homeless or the school they last attended, if you or a guardian requests such
    transportation

  • Participate in school programs with children who are not homeless

  • Enroll in school without giving a permanent address

  • Enroll and attend classes while the school arranges for the transfer of school and
    immunization records or any other documents required for enrollment

  • Enroll and attend classes in the school where you are seeking enrollment even while
    the school and you seek to resolve a dispute over enrolling your child

  • Receive the same programs and services, if needed, as provided to all other
    children served in these programs

If you have any questions, please contact the district Homeless Education Liaison, Laura Klock at (352) 486-5231 or laura.klock@levyk12.org. You may also learn more about your rights at the Florida Department of Education’s K-12 Bureau of Student Assistance at http://www.fldoe.org/bsa/title1/titlex.asp .

Cybersecurity and Cyber Safety for K-12 Schools and Districts

The information below is furnished by the Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools (REMS) Technical Assistance (TA) Center.

The ability to securely connect to virtual systems is an important element within a safe and supportive learning environment. That is why the Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools (REMS) Technical Assistance (TA) Center has spent the past year researching how cyber incidents affect education agencies and steps they can take to respond. The result of that research is the development of three fact sheets for schools, school districts and institutions of higher education (IHEs) on cyber safety and cybersecurity. Find details about each fact sheet below. To download a copy, click the fact sheet title.

  • Cyber Safety Considerations for K-12 Schools and Districts
    • Focuses on addressing cyber threats to students (i.e., the human element)
    • Lists and defines several of the most common cyber threats to students, including cyberbullying and access to inappropriate content.
    • Describes what schools can do before, during, and after an incident, including:
      • creating Responsible Use Policies (RUPs), filtering and blocking content, stressing digital citizenship, and providing training.
      • to whom students, teachers, and members of the public can report a concern.
    • Details how to create, review, or revise a cyber annex, including activities to address threats to students, through the six-step planning process described by the Guide for Developing High-Quality School Emergency Operations Plans (School Guide).
    • Provides additional resources.
  • Cybersecurity Considerations for K-12 Schools and Districts
    • Focuses on addressing threats to a school's or district's information technology network and systems.
    • Describes key privacy and confidentiality regulations and laws schools need to consider.
    • Lists and defines some of the most common threats to systems and networks, including data breaches and malware/scareware.
    • Describes what schools can do before, during, and after an incident, including:
      • creating firewalls, monitoring networks, and developing and promoting policies on responsible use.
      • to whom a school can report a cyber issue.
    • Details how to create, review, or revise a cyber annex, including activities to address threats to students, through the six-step planning process described by the School Guide.
    • Provides additional resources.

For general information related to cyber incidents, visit the NEW Topic-Specific Resources section of the REMS TA Center site:https://rems.ed.gov/Resources_Hazards-Threats_Adversarial_Threats.aspx

You may also access related Webinars we’ve created on this topic for K-12 and higher ed populations: